Total Rip-off Tuesday

I have lost my Kindle.  I'm sad about it.  However, I'm being a big girl about it (and by being a big girl, I mean:  "Please, Santa, bring me a new Kindle.  It's all I want.  Really.")

In the spirit of being a big girl, I've "ripped off" this post from the Christian Science Monitor:

Borders didn’t change with the digital times, as Barnes & Noble seems to be doing. And for every loss, I’m convinced, there is a gain. Sure, I am saddened and worried that the Internet is killing newspapers, civility, and church socials, but the Net has brought us unimaginable access to information, people, and goods and services. If bookstores are joining record stores as the latest bricks-and-mortar losers, our digital options are only getting better. Once you start using an iPad, Kindle, or other e-reader and experience the almost-instantaneous download of a book you just heard someone praise, it is hard to go back to browsing the aisles or waiting for the mail carrier to arrive.
You don’t need a physical book, though it is a beautiful thing. And a good bookstore is about more than books. Even if shopping-mall bookstores are not warm and fuzzy places, they are places where a certain amount of serendipity reigns, where you encounter other people taking pleasure in ideas. Bookstores are part of what sociologists call “third places” – destinations that are neither home nor office, places to linger without feeling that the meter is running or another customer wants your table.


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