Skip to main content

Re-Branding "Women"? Another stupid idea takes hold

In the course of a day, I read some stupid stuff.  I read a lot of inspiring stuff, a lot of uplifting stuff, a lot of  mundane stuff.  But there is plenty of stupid stuff out there.

Today I read this:  Ads To Rebrand Girls

Yeah, apparently, we females aren't good enough on our own.  Major parts of the world  want to get rid of us before we're even born, and now even Americans are 'fessing up to the fact that they'd prefer a boy.  Fast Company thus asked some ad companies to give us - the fairer, weaker, less-wanted sex - a boost.  And the results are horrifying.  Click the link above to see for yourself.

Apparently, you should want a girl because she's funny and high-performing.  We live longer, so perhaps we'll be able to support you in your old age.  We're not very strong, but we are unique. Also, we don't tend to set things on fire. So there.  Have a girl;  they are a great "brand" of human.

What a bunch of hooey.  Hooey, I say.  All this does is make it - once more - a "one gender is inherently better than the other" argument.  And guess what?  One gender is NOT better than the other.  Different:  yes.  Better:  no.

Blessed John Paul the Great, in 1995, addressed this very topic (and trust me, his treatment is so much easier to swallow than those stupid ads referenced above).  He actually got to the heart of the matter: 


The Book of Genesis speaks of creation in summary fashion, in language which is poetic and symbolic, yet profoundly true: "God created man in his own image, in the image of God he created him; male and female he created them" (Gen 1:27). The creative act of God takes place according to a precise plan. First of all, we are told that the human being is created "in the image and likeness of God" (cf. Gen 1:26). This expression immediately makes clear what is distinct about the human being with regard to the rest of creation.

We are then told that, from the very beginning, man has been created "male and female" (Gen 1:27). Scripture itself provides the interpretation of this fact: even though man is surrounded by the innumerable creatures of the created world, he realizes that he is alone (cf. Gen 2:20). God intervenes in order to help him escape from this situation of solitude: "It is not good that the man should be alone; I will make him a helper fit for him" (Gen 2:18). The creation of woman is thus marked from the outset by the principle of help: a help which is not one-sided but mutual. Woman complements man, just as man complements woman: men and women are complementary. Womanhood expresses the "human" as much as manhood does, but in a different and complementary way. (emphasis mine)

When the Book of Genesis speaks of "help", it is not referring merely to acting, but also to being. Womanhood and manhood are complementary not only from the physical and psychological points of view, but also from the ontological. It is only through the duality of the "masculine" and the "feminine" that the "human" finds full realization.

You see, "woman" doesn't make sense without "man".  There is a uniqueness and a complementarity that both express, but are made manifest wholly only with the other.

And the genius of women does NOT come at the detriment of men, or vice versa:

Necessary emphasis should be placed on the "genius of women", not only by considering great and famous women of the past or present, but also those ordinary women who reveal the gift of their womanhood by placing themselves at the service of others in their everyday lives. For in giving themselves to others each day women fulfill their deepest vocation. Perhaps more than men, women acknowledge the person, because they see persons with their hearts. They see them independently of various ideological or political systems. They see others in their greatness and limitations; they try to go out to them and help them. In this way the basic plan of the Creator takes flesh in the history of humanity and there is constantly revealed, in the variety of vocations, that beauty-not merely physical, but above all spiritual-which God bestowed from the very beginning on all, and in a particular way on women.

You know what's great about girls?  God made 'em.  And God made boys, so they are great too.  One gender is not a better "brand" than the other:  iPhone vs. Android,, Coke vs. Pepsi, Gucci vs. Chanel, Zelda vs. World of Warcraft.  Each gender is genius - made in the image and likeness of God, both meant to be celebrated, enjoyed, and encouraged to live to our fullest human potential.  Parents should treasure a boy OR a girl, love, play with, read to, discover, relate to, encounter, discipline and rejoice over each child, in HIS or HER singular expression of God's epitome of personhood and personality in the world.  A clear view of God's creation makes this definitive and certain.

We don't need an ad campaign to do that.

Comments

Post a Comment

I love comments, even if you don't agree, but please don't leave anonymous posts. A well-mannered reader leaves a name!

Popular posts from this blog

Trying to "end run" God

If you're a football fan, you know what an end run is. From Merriam-Webster:
a football play in which the ballcarrier attempts to run wide around the end of the line We try to "end run" God a lot. I do. I figure I know better. I've got this - no need to worry the Big Guy about such a trivial thing.

Of course, it never works.

Like the puppy above, when we try and evade the tough obstacle (even though we KNOW we will eventually have to do it), we end up - well, off in the bushes.

But oh! How I wished my way worked. I'd love to take a flying leap and land smoothly and gracefully. People would be in awe, as if watching Simone Biles nail a balance beam routine that no one else would even attempt. I would shyly look down and blush - just lightly - and acknowledge (But humbly! Oh so humbly!) my achievement.

But no: I am the one pulling myself out of the bushes, scratches all over my legs and twigs in my hair. I'd hear that gentle but loving voice of God saying, &quo…

Trauma Mama

Dear Husband and I both enjoy certain medical shows, such as "ER" and "Code Black." ("St. Elsewhere" was another fave!) These shows revolve around trauma: humans who'd been ambushed by life: a car accident, a fire, and abuse, as examples.

More often than not, these shows also highlight the trauma the doctors and nurses needed to deal with. Having a patient die is always offensive to a doctor: they are charged with saving lives and losing one is the ultimate failure. Nurses spend more time with patients, and can forge strong bonds with people that may be in their lives for just a few days.

But trauma doesn't always look like a bloody body being wheeled into an emergency room, or a house surrounded by fire trucks and police cars. Trauma comes in many forms.

According to one website, trauma can look like surgery. It can look like moving. Trauma can be losing a beloved spouse or more horrifying, a child. Trauma can also be chronic pain, loneliness, m…

Be Brave

A few years ago, it came to my attention that a young family member was struggling with anxiety and depression. I was able to share with her a bit of my own struggles, and let her know she wasn't alone.

A few weeks after our talk, I saw the movie, "Brave." It struck me that the young protagonist, Merida, modeled a great quality. She was indeed brave.

Being brave is not about recklessness. It is not about confidence. It's not about being foolish, or looking for glory in the eyes of others.

Bravery is about doing what is right, even when you are a quivering mess. It's about knowing that things may not turn out the way you expected, but forging ahead anyway. Being brave is standing by the hospital bed while a loved one is dying, and all you really want to do is turn back time. Bravery is standing up to a bully, when your legs are screaming for you to run. Brave is doing what needs to be done even when you're scared and tired and feeling helpless and hopeless.

I …