Did Lent change you?

It's Easter Monday - a day of thorough joy for Christians.  Most of us spent yesterday in worship and thanksgiving, and (if we are truly blessed) in the company of friends and family. (And if you're really, really blessed, you got to watch the Detroit Tigers pull out an awesome victory.)

Lent is done.  Our Lenten sacrifices are complete.  How did yours change you?  If your answer is, "It didn't, I guess", then you need to re-evaluate.

Catholics are known for "giving stuff up" for Lent.  We give up beer or chocolate, a favorite TV show, use of a website like Facebook.  Why?  Just to prove we can tough it out?  No, we do it so our very small sacrifice may help us be united more closely with the Great Sacrifice of Christ.  We want - in essence - to "help".

I think it was Scott Hahn who gave this example.  A mom is making a cake, and a small child wanders into the kitchen and asks, "Can I help?"  Truthfully, the child can't.  Really - four year olds are terrible at baking.  They can't follow recipes, they can't crack eggs well, they don't know how to measure.  But what does the mom say?  "Yes, of course".  And she pulls a chair over to the counter, lifts the child up and the child "helps".  The experience of cake-making is shared between mother and child.

This is how we "help" Christ.  Our giving up Facebook does not save anyone from sin, but it does allow us to draw closer to Christ, to share in the experience of sacrificial Love.

So the question is:  how did your experience of sacrifice change you during Lent?  If you pulled the chair up to the counter and helped bake the cake, what difference has it made in your life?  How are you closer to Christ because of it?

We are an Easter people, and Alleluia is our song.  The path we took to get to Easter is an important one.  How did your path, your Lent, change you?

No comments:

Post a Comment

I love comments, even if you don't agree, but please don't leave anonymous posts. A well-mannered reader leaves a name!

Into the Foggy Dew

If you've ever driven through a thick fog, you know what fear is. You can't see anything. You're not sure if you're stil...