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Vatican II and you

I had the great privilege of listening to Sr. Timothy Prokes, FSE on Saturday night, speaking about the Second Vatican Council. (She's written a slew of books; you can look them up. Be warned: she's a deep thinker and her writing is a challenge!)

She did a great job of putting the Council into context and reminding us that it was truly a miracle that the Council was pulled off. John XXIII, in a matter of months, had nearly every bishop in the world in Rome. Remember, this was a time before computers, when travel from many parts of the world was difficult, when putting together recording, microphones, television crews and other media was a Herculean effort. And yet, there it was.

Sr. Timothy spoke about the four Constitutions that came from the Council, and their great importance. She also urged us to read them. Think about it: the most significant event in Catholicism in centuries - literally - and most of us haven't bothered to read the documents. Her advice was to read just a small bit at a time, and really pray over and ponder it.

I started with Dei Verbum:

In His goodness and wisdom God chose to reveal Himself and to make known to us the hidden purpose of His will (see Eph. 1:9) by which through Christ, the Word made flesh, man might in the Holy Spirit have access to the Father and come to share in the divine nature (see Eph. 2:18; 2 Peter 1:4). Through this revelation, therefore, the invisible God (see Col. 1;15, 1 Tim. 1:17) out of the abundance of His love speaks to men as friends (see Ex. 33:11; John 15:14-15) and lives among them (see Bar. 3:38), so that He may invite and take them into fellowship with Himself. This plan of revelation is realized by deeds and words having an inner unity: the deeds wrought by God in the history of salvation manifest and confirm the teaching and realities signified by the words, while the words proclaim the deeds and clarify the mystery contained in them. By this revelation then, the deepest truth about God and the salvation of man shines out for our sake in Christ, who is both the mediator and the fullness of all revelation. 

God, who through the Word creates all things (see John 1:3) and keeps them in existence, gives men an enduring witness to Himself in created realities (see Rom. 1:19-20). Planning to make known the way of heavenly salvation, He went further and from the start manifested Himself to our first parents. Then after their fall His promise of redemption aroused in them the hope of being saved (see Gen. 3:15) and from that time on He ceaselessly kept the human race in His care, to give eternal life to those who perseveringly do good in search of salvation (see Rom. 2:6-7). Then, at the time He had appointed He called Abraham in order to make of him a great nation (see Gen. 12:2). Through the patriarchs, and after them through Moses and the prophets, He taught this people to acknowledge Himself the one living and true God, provident father and just judge, and to wait for the Savior promised by Him, and in this manner prepared the way for the Gospel down through the centuries.

The part I bolded is what struck me: "He ceaselessly kept the human race in His care". What a thought! I shall keep that in my heart today.

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