Learning to love and protect a little girl, a Child of the King


This little girl is five. She does not like the curls in hair, because it means sleeping in curlers, which are pokey and they hurt. She loves her new dress though, even though it's itchy. She's a little sad too, because her sisters both get to wear long yellow dresses that their grandma made for a wedding. They get to be in the wedding, but this little girl does not.

She's also happy that she has learned to read. All of a sudden, one Saturday morning, the letters on the page of "Little Red Riding Hood" suddenly made sense: they were words! And she could read them, not just recite what she knew from memory! It was the beginning of a love affair with words and language and books and writing and reading.

Her best friend is her sister. They are wild: they escape the house early in the morning and run and explore and create and imagine. When they finally must return home, their mother meets them outside, and pulls burrs and bugs from their hair before making them take a bath.

The only thing this little girl thinks about when it comes to her body is that it needs clothing, food and sleep.

But as the years pass, the girl's relationship with her body changes. She's too fat, and not very pretty. High school is hard. She doesn't really have any idea what to do with makeup, despite pouring over Seventeen every month.

When she marries, this girl has a husband who encourages her to try new things. So she walks, and rides a bike and learns that her body CAN do athletic things, just not the athletic things they wanted her to do in high school. Eventually, this little girl earns a bad ass third degree black belt in karate.

But middle age is tough. Genetics and hormones and a host of other circumstances take away much of her ability to be physically strong and to do whatever she wants her body to do. The little girl starts to hear very mean things that the woman she now sees in the mirror says to her: You are fat. You are ugly. How could anyone ever find you attractive? Fat. Fat. Ugly. Do you hear me?? YOU ARE UGLY!!! And the woman in the mirror - and the little girl - believe every single word.

One day, the woman -  you know, that fat and ugly woman - is going through photos. And she sees this little girl. This beautiful little girl. She remembers her.

The woman realizes she would never call this little girl ugly. Or fat. Or incapable. She would never look this little girl in the eye and say those horrible words to her.

But she does. Every single day.

The woman decides that from now on, no one - not even the woman - will call this girl names. The woman will protect this little girl. No one will be allowed to bully her, or make her feel as if she anything less than a Daughter of the King, blessed and beautiful, heir to a Kingdom beyond anything that this cruel world can offer. The woman will not allow any ugliness to harm this girl - she is far too precious, far too loved, far too priceless.

As proof that you are children, God sent the spirit of his Son into our hearts, crying out, “Abba, Father!” So you are no longer a slave but a child, and if a child then also an heir, through God. (Gal. 4:7)

1 comment:

  1. love this story - so many can relate, including myself. Thanks for a great article.

    ReplyDelete

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